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ColorKitchen Decorative Food Coloring From Nature

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While a growing movement of consumers have prompted major manufacturers to remove artificial colors and flavors from their foods, it’s still a challenge to find naturally colored frostings or decorations in the baking aisle. But that is changing thanks to ColorKitchen. ColorKitchen is introducing a new array of natural color and rainbow sprinkle sets that come in seven exciting combinations. The new line combines sprinkles and food color packets into convenient 5 Party and Holiday sets that includes enough food coloring to color a pint of frosting, along with a bag of coordinating sprinkles. 

ColorKitchen colors are sourced from the finest, most vibrant plant sources available. ColorKitchen colors are made from simple ingredients, containing pigments from turmeric, spirulina, beet, radish, cabbage, and annatto. ColorKitchen products are gmo-free, gluten-free and vegan,  but they are manufactured in a facility that also processes nuts and other foods with allergens. 

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The party and holiday sets include: 

  • Blue, with multicolored rainbow sprinkles
  • Pink, with multicolored rainbow sprinkles
  • Yellow, with multicolored rainbow sprinkles
  • Be Mine, a Valentine’s Day set with pink frosting and pink, white, and red heart sprinkles
  • Holiday, green frosting with green and red tree-shaped sprinkles

What are artificial food dyes?  

Coloring agents such as FD & C Red No. 40 are petroleum-based, chemically produced dyes that were invented in the early 1900s. Little was known about the effect of synthetic food colors on our health, but with increased manufacturing production and grocery distribution, food companies found inventive new ways to market foods using artificial food coloring.

Dangers of using artificial food coloring

Through the years, concerns have been raised about the safety of artificial food dyes, mostly surrounding behavioral health disorders, allergic reactions, and carcinogenic properties.

  • ADHD
  • Carcinogenic contaminants
  • Allergic reactions

The major concern is the effect artificial food colorings have on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Even more severe health issues have been brought to light. According to the CSPI, the three most widely used dyes, Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6, are contaminated with known carcinogens. Red 3 has been a recognized carcinogen by the FDA for years, yet it is still allowed in foods.

Allergic reactions to artificial coloring are widely reported, from rashes and watering eyes to asthma.

More major players are sure to follow suit, proving the public has decided to advocate with their buying dollars and put their children’s health first.

You can find ColorKitchen products in retail locations across the US, including Whole Foods, and dozens on health food stores. To find a location nearest you, click here.

Disclaimer: I received one or more of the products mentioned above for free. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I was not paid to write this review.

Published by

Jessica

I've been on a gluten free diet since January 2009. It's been an adventure, and a challenge at times. I love to go to new restaurants and try new foods, and being gluten free can make eating out difficult at times. But I will not let my dietary restrictions get in my way of finding new restaurants and products. These are my stories of being a young women in a big city, eating out and trying new foods, all while NOT eating gluten. Like I said, it's an adventure and you are welcome to come along... Please note that as I try to eat gluten free 100% of the time, my intolerance is not as severe as others so please use caution when dining at restaurants that are not certified gluten free.